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Baofeng 997-S GT Transceiver (USA Warranty) 65-108 / 136-174 / 400-520 MHz Dual-Band Two-Way Ham Radio (Latest RDA1846S Chipset)

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  • The SCR-287 comprised a complete liaison radio station installed onboard various bombers and transports during WWII. The transmitter used was the BC-375 along with the BC-348 as a receiver. The other components shown are the BC-348-Q receiver which does run on its original dynamotor from the battery supply, the Lionel J-47 telegraph key and the Shure Bros. carbon microphone, the T-17. The speaker is an LS-3, although these were never used in the SCR-287 or onboard the aircraft. Four BC-375 Tuning Units are mounted in their CS-48 containers on the wall. The olive-drab console is not a WWII vintage item - it's homebrew. It features a fold-down desk, a sound-proof (almost) compartment for the PE-73 dynamotor and a bottom shelf for the four storage batteries (four 12v batteries in series-parallel = 24vdc.) The panel to the left of the BC-348 has all of the remote connections for receiver audio output, receiver stand-by, xmtr CW sidetone select, xmtr microphone input and xmtr key input. The photo shows the station as it was set-up in the Western Historic Radio Museum in Virginia City, Nevada from 2009 until 2012. The station is now set up in Dayton, Nevada where it runs on a PP-1104 high current +28vdc power source (instead of +24vdc worth the batteries.)

    “Blow Your Mind,” which appears on the artist’s forthcoming, self-titled debut album, will be the first Dua Lipa single to receive a formal US radio push.

  • Nowadays, the T-47/ART-13 is finding increased popularity as a very practical ham transmitter for vintage military station operation. The transmitter can provide plenty of power and excellent audio allowing many military radio enthusiasts to use their T-47/ART-13 station for regular AM net operation also. The HV can be safely increased to around +1400vdc to provide even more output power and some brave users will run the HV up as high as +2000vdc (not for the timid and distortion might be encountered at this level of HV.) This assumes that the user is building an AC operated power supply rather than using the "hard to find" original dynamotor or the impossible to find TCZ power supply.

    If you enjoy using Radio Boulevard - Western Historic Radio Museum's website as an information resource and have found our photos, our hard to find information or our restoration articles helpful, then please consider a donation to the WHRM website. A small donation will help with the expenses of website operation, which includes research, photographing and composition. WHRM was a real museum that was "Open-to-the-Public" from 1994 to 2012 - eighteen years of operation. WHRM will continue to provide its on-line information source with this website, which has been in operation since 1997.


    photo above:  USAAF T-47A/ART-13,aka AN/ART-13A. Note the blank panel installed to replace the LFO. Also note that the two meters do not match. This is very common to find on many ART-13 transmitters and was probably a result of depot repairwork.

    The T-47/ART-13 and its variations had a very long life. Introduced around 1943-44, actively used during and after WWII and well into the fifties (sometimes found still being used well into the sixties and early seventies.) The USSR also produced a copy of the ART-13 that they used up well into the 1980s (the R-807.) Because of its long useful life, most T-47/ART-13 transmitters found today will have had many scratches and a few dents and paint scrapes. Sometimes non-matching modules will be encountered with some parts having MFP applied and others that are bare. A book containing brief instructions and the calibration settings for specific frequencies is usually stored in the metal pocket underneath the transmitter. This book is also usually missing on most transmitters although the same information is in the standard manuals. Luckily, thousands and thousands of T-47/ART-13 were built and spare parts are very easy to find which allows for the fairly easy restoration and maintenance of these durable and potent transmitters.

    Nowadays, the T-47/ART-13 is finding increased popularity as a very practical ham transmitter for vintage military station operation. The transmitter can provide plenty of power and excellent audio allowing many military radio enthusiasts to use their T-47/ART-13 station for regular AM net operation also. The HV can be safely increased to around +1400vdc to provide even more output power and some brave users will run the HV up as high as +2000vdc (not for the timid and distortion might be encountered at this level of HV.) This assumes that the user is building an AC operated power supply rather than using the "hard to find" original dynamotor or the impossible to find TCZ power supply.

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    Western Historic Radio Museum - Information
     
    Contact Info, Museum History 1994-2012, Museum Photo Tour, Using Photos and Info from this Website & Radio Value Info

    Nevada Radio History - 1906 to 1930
    Arthur Raycraft, Nevada's "Father of Wireless," America's First Radio Tour, Early Nevada BC Stations & More

    KOWL's Gates BC-250L BC Transmitter
    2007 Move from Lake Tahoe - Restoration - PLUS -  2013 Move to Dayton, Nevada & Getting on 160M 

    I don’t usually listen to Christian radio because I prefer not to listen to the announcers, ads, and call ins. But some ladies in my small group were talking it about it the other night. They love it and are encouraged in the faith through it. So I’ll cheer it on.

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The was invented in 1904 by the English physicist . He developed a device he called an "oscillation valve" (because it passes current in only one direction). The heated filament, or , was capable of of electrons that would flow to the (or ) when it was at a higher voltage. Electrons, however, could not pass in the reverse direction because the plate was not heated and thus not capable of thermionic emission of electrons. Later known as the , it could be used as a of alternating current and as a radio wave . This greatly improved the which rectified the radio signal using an early solid-state diode based on a crystal and a so-called . However, what was still required was an amplifier.