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Square Root Games 4-Player Mancala Strategy Game

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  • The fourth game is a version of Bao Kiswahili; another very popular game played on a four-rank Mancala board, which is played in Zanzibar, Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia and eastern Zaire. The full game of Bao Kiswahili is one of the most complicated of all the Mancala games so for this reason, a beginners version called "" has been outlined.

    "Mancala" is played on a 2x6 or 2x7 board with hollows. At first, number of stones puts into hollows randomly but later, a certain number of stones has been put. Today, in Mancala game there are 12 hollows in the middle and 2 houses on each sides. Both players puts four pieces of stone to all hollows. To decide who goes first, first player takes four stones in any hollows and move anti-clockwise around the board with dropping the stones.
    The difference of Turkish mancala from the others, they puts into stone in house section. This rule doesn't apply on the other mancalas. If the player's last stone comes to house section, plays one more time. If the player’s last stone makes the opponent's stones even number player puts all the pieces to their own house. If any player's hollows stay empty the game ends. Player who captures the most stones wins the round.

  • The third game is simply called Bao (although Bao is a generic term referring to a number of Mancala games played in East Africa). We have two versions played on a 2 x 8 board in Kenya - and a version of played with 32 pieces.

    Mancala is a family of board games played around the world, sometimes called "sowing" games, or "count-and-capture" games, which describes the game-play. Mancala games play a role in many African and some Asian societies comparable to that of chess in the West, or the game of Go in Eastern Asia. Kalaha is a form of the popular board game Mancala family, and it's probably the game you're thinking about when you say "Mancala." Kalaha is easy to learn and fun to play.

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    Mancala Snails
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    Very cool and fun Mancala game online free to play. Collect as many snails as possible before one of the players clears his side of snails.

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    Folding Mancala
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    Play Mancala games on the go! This folding Mancala board game makes it easy to play on travel or anywhere.

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    Hand Made Mancala
    Popular Product

    African Art imported Hand Made Mancala Oware board games and stones from Ghana, Tanzania and other countries of Africa. Often the stones are real stones and the hand craft boards are made from original African trees like Mtoo tree.

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    Mancala Stones
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    Each set of mancala stones is enough for a replacement set.

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  • 4 player Mancala Game Set
    Popular Board Game

    The world's only 4 player Mancala set.

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    Excalibur Backgammon Mancala
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    Play Backgammon or Mancala against the computer or compete with a friend. Dual controls pack quickly in the unit for travel

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    Kid-Cala
    Popular Board Game

    This game takes the African strategy game of Mancala and creates a version just for kids. Features three sets of rules.

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    Mancala Gems
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    Play Mancala with the computer. This is the ancient game of Mancala, the object of this game is to collect as many gems in your mancala as possible.

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    Bao is what we call a mancala game. Mancala is the term to denominate games with one shared characteristic: moves are not executed as in chess or checkers, instead moves are executed by sowing seeds (or other playing pieces) into holes. Mancala games occur mainly in Africa and Asia, and in parts of the New World settled by natives of those regions.

Mancala Game | Sturbridge Yankee Workshop

Mancala games vary considerably in size. The largest are Tchouba (Mozambique) and En Gehé (Tanzania). Tchouba employs a board of 160 (4x40) holes and needs 320 seeds. En Gehé (Tanzania) is played on longer rows with up to 50 pits (a total of 2x50=100) and uses 400 seeds. The most minimalistic variants are Nano-Wari and Micro-Wari, created by the Bulgarian ethnologue Assia Popova. The Nano-Wari board has eight seeds in just two pits; Micro-Wari has a total of four seeds in four pits.