Sheriff, monster in King of New York, published by IELLO.

Kong, new monster in King of New York, published by IELLO.

Wesley Snipes plays it cool in ‘King of New York’.

King of New York Board Game

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  • Review
  • TAG : KING OF NEW YORK, Christopher Walken, 1990.
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  • Critically scorned when released, I’m struggling as to why King Of New York got such a bad rap sheet at the time. It’s a smashing crime film which is never boring, and doesn’t outstay it’s welcome. A better extras selection would have been nice, but King of New York is a hidden gem of the crime genre, touched up to a high-quality quality Blu-ray standard for a new generation, and a film that comes highly recommended.

    It’s always nice to discover something usually not considered mainstream cinema that’s still high in quality, a forgotten gem if you will. King Of New York neatly encapsulates the time when rap was hitting the streets big time and influenced organised crime in New York City. With a who’s who of American film and TV actors, there’s not a lot to hate in this classic slice of mob action.

  • Upon his release from Sing Sing prison, former mob head Frank White (Christopher Walken, Click) sets out to regain his old kingdom of New York City. However, he’s had a change of heart from the greed like other gangs have and becomes a “Robin Hood” style martyr; using drug money to fund the building of hospitals in the local community and such. The local police force still doesn’t take kindly to Frank, so he and his head solider Jimmy Jack (Lawrence Fishburne, The Matrix) have to take on the police and rival gang members head on; on a road paved with deceit, murder, and double crosses.

    Upon his release from Sing Sing prison, former mob head Frank White (Christopher Walken, Click) sets out to regain his old kingdom of New York City. However, he’s had a change of heart from the greed like other gangs have and becomes a “Robin Hood” style martyr; using drug money to fund the building of hospitals in the local community and such. The local police force still doesn’t take kindly to Frank, so he and his head solider Jimmy Jack (Lawrence Fishburne, The Matrix) have to take on the police and rival gang members head on; on a road paved with deceit, murder, and double crosses.

  • King of New York
    Theatrical release poster
    Directed by Abel Ferrara
    Produced by Augusto Caminito
    Mary Kane
    Written by Nicholas St. John
    Starring
    • Christopher Walken
    • Larry Fishburne
    • David Caruso
    • Steve Buscemi
    • Victor Argo
    • Wesley Snipes
    • Janet Julian
    • Joey Chin
    • Giancarlo Esposito
    • Paul Calderon
    Music by Joe Delia
    Cinematography Bojan Bazelli
    Edited by Anthony Redman
    Distributed by Seven Arts Pictures (through New Line Cinema)
    Release dates
    September 22, 1990 (limited)
    Running time
    106 minutes
    Country Italy
    United States[1]
    Language English
    Box office $2,554,476

    Upon researching this film, I was surprised audiences slaughtered it upon release; whilst it had favourable reviews (and still does to this day) people allegedly walking out of preview screenings and the premiere is not a good sign. But, you know, I don’t get why. King of New York isn’t the greatest mob film you’ll ever see, but it’s sure as hell better than what passes as crime nowadays (here’s looking at you ). King Of New York is a terrific little film and a genuine surprise, and welcome addition, to my Blu-Ray collection.

KING OF NEW YORK, Janet Julian, Christopher Walken, 1990


Abel Ferrara’s King of New York was a milestone film for me in many ways. In my early years as a voracious film fan, I graduated from typical adventure fare through the 80s action classics into the gangster genre. While many cineastes of my age went down the horror path, that was never really a thing for me at that age. Instead, I was attracted to the work of Coppola and Scorsese, which in turn opened the doors wider to more challenging journeys into the criminal underworld.